Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Joseph Somes, Captain Edward Goldsmith and the "Angelina" 1844-46

FEMALE TRANSPORT Angelina 1844, owner Joseph SOMES
BARQUE Angelina 1845, Captain Edward GOLDSMITH and apprentice, son Richard Sydney Goldsmith
FRENCH WHALER Angelina 1849 ex Le Havre

Joseph Somes (1787-1845)
Joseph Somes, owner of the female convict transport Angelina, 366/433 tons, built at Hull in 1842, brokered the ship with Lachlans and Co. on 20th March 1844. The Angelina sailed from London on 29th April 1844 with 170 female convicts and 20 children on board, arriving at Hobart, Van Diemen's Land (Tasmania) on 21st August 1844.



Phillips, George Henry, 1800?-. Wood, John 1801-1870 :Joseph Somes. Engraved by George Henry Phillips, painted by John Wood. [London. Between 1830 and 1845?]. Ref: C-043-007.
Source: Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. /records/22773127

BIOGRAPHY
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Somes

Joseph SOMES (b. 9 December 1787 - d. 27 June 1845) was a British shipowner and Conservative politician.

Family
Born in Stepney, London, Somes was the youngest son of Samuel Somes (1758-1816) and Sarah née Green. In 1811, he married Mary Ann Daplyn, daughter of Thomas Daplyn of Stepney, and they had one surviving daughter. However, after her death in 1835, he remarried to Maria Saxton in 1837. Saxton was the daughter of Charles Saxton and sister of Charles Waring Saxton, an early migrant to New Zealand, and Somes' lawyer, Edward Saxton.

Maritime career
Somes' early life saw him apprenticed to his father as a lighterman and then, at the age of 15, sent to sea, working in the coal and coastal trades. At age 21, he became a captain of one of his father's ships, then remaining at sea until 1816 and developing his knowledge of worldwide shipping and navigation.

Upon his father's death in 1818, the firm was extremely prosperous and he became a partner with his elder brother, Samuel, continuing to run the business in a financially successful way, even during difficult post-war years. By the time of his brother's death, Somes was operating as owner, sailmaker and chandler, as well as a charterer, especially for the East India Company.

In the 1830s, under Somes' sole ownership, the firm became one of the largest in Britain, and Somes took advantage of the breakup of the East India Company's fleet to purchase a number of its best ships, including the Lowther Castle and Earl of Balcarres. The firm's ships sailed mostly to the East Indies but also began to operate newly in Australasia, including whaling. They also travelled to Africa, The Americas, and the Baltic, but less often. By 1842, Somes' fleet spanned to at least 40 ships, and he was the largest private shipowner in the world--sometimes chartering ships to the government to transport convicts, stores, and troops.

As a consequence of his career, Somes developed an interest in the British colonies, investing in the Western Australia Company and the North American Colonisation Society of Ireland. Mostly, however, he invested in the New Zealand Company, which he joined when it refounded in 1838, and then sold to it its first ship, the Tory -- which was sent to New Zealand in 1839 with a shipload of settlers, but without governmental permission. He then became a governor of the company in 1840, in which role he spearheaded an aggressive campaign to secure government recognition for the company, gaining financial concessions but no central role in the country's colonisation.

Somes was well known at the London Stock Exchange, an originator of the Lloyds Register of Shipping in 1834, and active within the General Shipowners' Society. He was frequently called to give evidence to government inquiries. In his later years, however, allies of his believed he would betray the company, which was close to collapse upon his death in 1845.

Member of Parliament
After unsuccessfully contesting Great Yarmouth at the 1841 general election, Somes was elected Member of Parliament for Dartmouth at a by-election in 1844--caused by the death of Sir John Henry Seale, 1st Baronet. Entering parliament required him to transfer ownership of his ships to his nephews, or he would have been disqualified as a government contractor. Somes held the seat for just six months until his death in 1845.

Death
Somes died on 25 June 1845 at his home on Mile End Road, London, and was then buried in the family vault of St Dunstan's in Stepney on 2 July. He had an estimated wealth of £434,000.

References
Rayment, Leigh (13 June 2017). "The House of Commons: Constituencies beginning with "D"". Leigh Rayment's Peerage Page. Archived from the original on 1 November 2018. Retrieved 2018.

Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885 (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. p. 103. ISBN 978-1-349-02349-3.

Unknown (2004). "Somes, Joseph (1787-1845)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/37993.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)

Stooks Smith, Henry. (1973) [1844-1850]. Craig, F. W. S., ed. The Parliaments of England (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. pp. 229-231. ISBN 0-900178-13-2.

External links
Hansard 1803-2005: contributions in Parliament by Mr Joseph Somes
Source:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Somes

JOSEPH SOMES' CONVICT TRANSPORTS
This is a list of the convict ships owned by Joseph Somes from 1839 to 1846:

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Marquis of Hastings of 1839, 452 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co., commenced 29 January 1839, 150 female convicts and 20 children, sailed 17 March 1839 arrived 18 July 1839.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Mary Ann of 1840, 394 tons, brokered by Somes, commenced 17 September 1840, 124 female convicts and 38 children, sailed 27 November 1840, arrived 19 March 1841.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Layton of 1839, 513 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 9 May 1839, 260 male convicts. Sailed 13 July 1839, arrived 7 December 1839.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Barossa of 1839, 729 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 11 June 1839, 350 male convicts. Sailed 3 August 1839, arrived 8 December 1839.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Nautilus of 1839, 729 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 1 August 1839, 200 male convicts. Sailed 17 October 1839, arrived 15 February 1840.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Maitland of 1840, 648 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 6 January 1840, 305 male convicts. Sailed 20 March 1840, arrived 14 July 1840.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Asia of 1840, 536 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 27 February 1840, 276 male convicts. Sailed 27 April 1840, arrived 5 August 1840.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Eden of 1840, 522 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 16 May 1840, 270 male convicts. Sailed 11 July 1840, arrived 18 November 1840.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Lord Lynedoch of 1840, 638 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 29 July 1840, 180 female convicts and 12 children. Sailed 11 September 1840, arrived 5 February 1841.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Layton of 1841, 513 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 5 February 1840, 250 male convicts. Sailed 9 April 1841, arrived 1 September 1841.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Mexborough of 1841, 376 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 22 May 1841, 145 female convicts and 35 children. Sailed 12 August 1841, arrived 26 December 1841.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Prince Regent of 1841, 394 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 22 May 1841, 181 male convicts. Sailed 7 August 1841, arrived 6 January 1842.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Barossa of 1841, 720 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 1 July 1841, 350 male convicts. Sailed 1 July 1841, arrived 13 January 1842.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Sir George Arthur of 1842, 339 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 3 March 1842, convicts not given, wrecked at Bermuda. arrived 3 June 1842.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Emily of 1842, 461 tons, brokered by Pirie and Co. Commenced 14 April 1842, 240 male convicts. Sailed 29 June 1842, arrived 21 November 1842.

J. Somes (albeit given as Sonies (sic), owner of convict transport Marquis of Hastings of 1842, 452 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 11 May 1842, 240 male convicts. Sailed 17 July 1842, arrived 7 November 1842.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Maitland of 1843, 648 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 7 June 1843, 199 male convicts. Sailed 1 September 1843, arrived 12 January 1844.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Cadet of 1844, 648 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced either 5 January or February 1844, 164 male convicts. Sailed 9 April 1844, 21 August 1844.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Maria Somes of 1844, 600 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 6 March 1844, 264 male convicts. Sailed 26 April 1844, arrived 29 July 1844.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Barossa of 1844, 729 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 11 March 1844, 170 female convicts and 20 children. Sailed 29 April 1844, arrived 21 August 1844.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Angelina of 1844, 366 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 20 March 1844, 170 female convicts and 20 children. Sailed 29 April 1844, arrived 21 August 1844.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Sir George Seymour of 1844, 730 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 6 September 1844, 345 male convicts. Sailed 8 November 1844, arrived not given.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport La Belle Alliance of 1844, 676 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 28 November 1844, 200 male convicts. Sailed 17 January 1845, arrived 8 February to Gibraltar not Australia.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Mount Stuart Elphinstone of 1844, 611 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 14 December 1844, 260 male convicts. Sailed 3 March 1845, arrived 4 July 1845.

J. and F. Somes, owner of convict transport Tory of 1845, 432 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 6 February 1845, 170 female convicts and 35 children. Sailed 22 March 1845, arrived 4 July 1845.

J. and F. Somes, owner of convict transport Adelaide of 1846, 639 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 28 May 1846, 300 male convicts. Sailed 11 July 1846, arrived not reported.

Source: list of the ships owned by Joseph Somes prepared by the website Pathways to the Convict Contractors to Australia, sourced from the page formerly located at http://www.merchantnetworks.com.au/timelines/pathways2.htm [broken link]

The female transport "Angelina" arrives in the Derwent
James Lucas (1792?-1853) was the river pilot who was tied to the mast when he boarded the female convict transport Angelina (434 tons) as it entered the River Derwent on 24th August 1844. The captain asked him to produce his authority, but he was not able to show his pilot's licence, which he seldom carried: -
Thereupon the captain abused him and, when Lucas showed resentment, lashed him to the rigging, and had the ship taken in by an unlicensed pilot.
Source: Australian Dictionary of Biography
http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/lucas-james-2379



Detail of map showing D'Entrecasteaux Channel and Storm Bay, entrance to the River Derwent
Source: Hall, S., A New General Atlas, with the Divisions and Boundaries, 1835. - See more at: http://www.geographicus.com/P/AntiqueMap/TasmaniaVanDiemensLand-hall-1835#sthash.K4aE7kDb.dpuf

This newspaper article reported the outrage and incorrectly named the ship Angelica :
Disgraceful Assault. — On Saturday afternoon, as the female prison-ship Angelica [sic - Angelina] was coming up the river, she was boarded by Mr. Lucas, our old and well-known pilot. Upon going on board, he was asked for his licence, the authority by which he acted. Mr. Lucas replied, that he had been in Government employment for thirty years, during twenty-three of which he had acted as pilot, and, with the exception of the present instance, he had only once before been asked such a question: besides, his boat bore the pilot-flag, with Mr. Lucas's name as a pilot; and, under these circumstances, Mr. Lucas did not think it necessary to carry his licence about him. To satisfy the captain, however, Mr. Lucas sent his boat ashore for the purpose of bringing back the 'authority.' During the boat's absence, the captain became impatient, and, refusing to wait, made a signal for another pilot, when Mr. Harburgh— who, we believe, has no licence —came on board, to whom the captain gave the command of the ship. In the meantime, words ensued between the gallant captain and the veteran pilot, which led to some violence on the part of the former, accompanied by the most insolent and opprobious abuse. This, Mr. Lucas very naturally and and properly resisted, when a tussle ensued, which resulted in our old friend being lashed to the rigging by the captain and his crew, in which situation he remained for some time, and, on being liberated, went ashore in Mr. Harburgh's boat. There could be no rational excuse for this unmanly, unseaman-like outrage, as the captain must have known Mr. Lucas, having formerly visited the colony as mate on the ship John, also a prison-ship, we believe; while Mr. Lucas was also known to several or the crew. We shall, no doubt. have the full particulars in due time, as such an offence against the law, as well as against the person of Mr. Lucas, will not be suffered to pass unnoticed, nor, we hope, unpunished. These particulars, when they transpire, we shall report . Colonial Times, Aug 27th.
Source: The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880) Sat 31 Aug 1844 Page 3 POLICE REPORT.



Convict Indent Record for the Angelina (clearly not misspelt here as the Angelica)
Arrived VDL 25 August 1844
Source: Archives Office Tas: CON15-1-3,360,1,F,37

See the Addenda below for names recorded on the sick lists of the female convict ship "Angelina" in the Medical journal for 3 April to 31 August 1844 by J E Ring, surgeon and superintendent.

Captain Edward Goldsmith and the "Angelina" 1845
Shortly before British shipowner and Conservative politician Joseph Somes' death on 27th June 1845, one of his large fleet of ships, the female transport Angelina, was offered for sale to Robert Brooks for the Australian wool trade. Robert Brooks registered his purchase on 20th May 1845 and  engaged merchant mariner Captain Edward Goldsmith to command the Angelina to Port Jackson (Sydney NSW) with a cargo of luxury goods and emigrants. On 15th July 1845, Captain Goldsmith set sail from London with his eldest son, 15 yr old Richard Sydney Goldsmith (named after Edward's father Richard Goldsmith snr), whom he had indentured as an apprentice on the voyage. The barque Angelina (434 tons) arrived at Port Jackson NSW via the Cape of Good Hope on 12th December 1845. Crew members and "various" numbered nineteen (19) which included 15 yr old apprentice Richard Sydney Goldsmith. Passengers numbered fourteen (14) in cabin, and nine (9) in steerage.

RICHARD SYDNEY GOLDSMITH (1830-1854)
Richard Sydney Goldsmith was born at the Swan River, Western Australia on 20th May 1830 just days after his mother's arrival from London on the brig James, his father Captain Edward Goldsmith in command. His parents Captain Edward Goldsmith of Rotherhithe, London and Chalk, Kent, 25 years old (1804-1869), newly wed to Elizabeth Day, 27 yrs old (1802-1875), on 24th June 1829 at St George, Derby Square, Liverpool, Lancashire (UK)  had set sail on the brig James, a 195 ton second class American vessel built in 1812, to the new settlement on the Swan River, Western Australia on 23rd December 1829, five months after their marriage.  When the vessel departed, Captain Goldsmith's wife Elizabeth was three months' pregnant with their first child, Richard Sydney Goldsmith.

After a calamitous voyage the James finally arrived at the Swan River on 8th May 1830 with Elizabeth Goldsmith due to give birth.  Twelve days later the birth of Richard Sydney was announced in the press. Stranded at Swan River with the James wrecked by storms within days of their arrival, the family of three proceeded to Hobart (VDL) aboard the Bombay and thence to Sydney where Captain Goldsmith took command of the Norval bound for London. While in Sydney, they christened new-born Richard Sydney Goldsmith at St. Philips on 11th November 1830. Once back in London, they registered his birth and baptism again at St. Mary Rotherhithe in 1838, where later, in 1847, Captain James Day, brother of Elizabeth Goldsmith and navigator on his brother-in-law Captain Goldsmith's early voyages, would register the birth and baptism of their eldest daughter Elizabeth Rachel Day born to Rachel Day nee Pocock. Elizabeth Rachel Day, Richard Sydney Goldsmith jnr's first cousin, would later become the wife of photographer Thomas J. Nevin (Hobart July 1871).



Richard Sydney Goldsmith birth and bapt (1830-1854)
Source: NSW Registry of BDM



Parents Captain Edward and Elizabeth Goldsmith registered their son Richard Sydney's baptism again, eight years later, at St Mary Rotherhithe (Surrey UK) on May 19th 1838 on presentation of the original certificate (see subscript). Here too the spelling of Richard's second name is "Sidney".
Source: London England Church of England Births and Baptisms 1813-1917.



APPRENTICES' INDENTURES 1845
Fourteen year old Richard Sydney Goldsmith was due to serve a six year apprenticeship from the 22nd August 1845 to the 22nd August 1851 with W. Walker on board the Perseverance. His father Captain Edward Goldsmith, however, stepped in, cancelled it with the consent of the master, and signed up his son Richard Sydney to an indenture to be served with him on the Angelina, departing four weeks sooner, in July rather than August 1845.



Indenture cancelled on the Perseverance August 1845
Detail below of above:



Detail: Apprentices' Indentures 1845
Number of Register Ticket: 1840608
Name of Apprentice; Goldsmith R
Age when Bound: 14
Date of Indenture: 22 Aug 45
Date of Enrolment of Indenture: 23 Aug 45
Term for which Bound: 6 (yrs)
Indenture expires: 22 Aug 51
Name and Residences of Parties to whom Bound:  W. Walker Londn
Vessel in which Apprentice is to Serve:Perseverance 191 (tonnage)
Superscribed in red ink: cancelled by masters consent  at Lond. 22 6 48
Last Report: /
Remarks: /
Source: The National Archives, Kew
Ref: 42482_6117462_0007-00407

Indentured on the Angelina July 1845



Detail below:



Detail:Apprentices' Indentures 1845
Number of Register Ticket: 29.661
Name of Apprentice; Goldsmith Richard Sydney
Age when Bound: 15
Date of Indenture: 12 July 45
Date of Enrolment of Indenture: 15 July 45
Term for which Bound: 4 (yrs)
Indenture expires: 12 July 49
Name and Residences of Parties to whom Bound:  Edward Goldsmith Rotherhithe
Vessel in which Apprentice is to Serve: Angelina 433 (tonnage)
Last Report: at Launceston 7/48 rev. 7/49
Remarks: Expired

Source: The National Archives, Kew
Ref: 42482_635001_0004-00164

Registry of Shipping and Seamen: Apprentices' Indentures
Reference: BT 151
Title: Registry of Shipping and Seamen: Apprentices' Indentures
Description: This series comprises records of apprentices indentured in the merchant navy kept by the Registrar General of Shipping and Seamen and its predecessor.
Date: 1845-1962
Related material: See BT 150
Held by: The National Archives, Kew
Legal status: Public Record(s)
Language: English
Creator: General Register and Record Office of Seamen, 1835-1872
Link; https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C3189

In all, the month of July 1845 saw Captain Edward Goldsmith make some swift changes to the course of his life and that of his eldest son Richard Sydney Goldsmith.  Ship owner Robert Brooks made the decision to sell the Parrock Hall, 425 tons, built at Yarmouth in 1837 and registered to him on 5th May 1844, replacing it with the older ship North Briton (402 tons) on 14th June 1845 (Broeze 1993:150). Having swapped his commission to sail the Parrock Hall, which was due to depart on 15th July 1845 on yet one more round trip to Port Jackson (Sydney NSW), Captain Edward Goldsmith sailed instead on that very date for Sydney in command of the Angelina, Robert Brook's newest acquisition which had been transformed from a female transport ship within months of returning from Van Diemen's Land (Tasmania). Now fitted out as a merchant barque with a cargo of luxury goods and well-heeled passengers, the Angelina sailed for Port Jackson, NSW on 19th July 1845 with Richard Sydney Goldsmith indentured as his father's apprentice thanks to another swift decision on his father's part to cancel his son's prior engagement as an apprentice on the Perseverance.

TO HOBART and SYDNEY 1849 and death at HOBART 1854
It seems a life of service at sea was not to Richard Sydney Goldsmith's liking. He served a short apprentice with his father on the Angelina, and was due to serve on the Perseverance until the expiry of his indenture in 1851, but that was cancelled. He had arrived at Hobart as a passenger on board the Rattler with his mother Elizabeth, his father in command on 27th November 1849  but returned to Sydney within weeks as a passenger on the Royal Saxon, a wool ship owned by Robert Brook's agent at Sydney, Robert Towns (Broeze 1993:218). Richard Sydney Goldsmith may have taken to accounting with Robert Towns, or even trained at the Union Bank of NSW, because he returned at some point to join the staff of the Union Bank of Van Diemen's Land as a cashier, a position he held when he contracted typhoid and died on 17th August 1854.



Royal Saxon (510 tons), Capt Charlesworh from Hobart to Sydney,16th December
SMH 29th December 1849
Passenger Mr. R. S. Goldsmith

Fallen ill with fever, Richard Sydney Goldsmith was attended by Dr Edward Samuel Pickard Bedford (1809-1876) at St Mary's Hospital, erected in 1847. Edward Bedford was the medical officer for the City in 1852, on whose committee Captain Goldsmith served when Bedford campaigned for election in February 1855. But on 15th August 1854, at his father's house, Richard Sydney Goldsmith died, just 24 yrs old. He was buried in St David's cemetery opposite the family home, 19 Davey Street  Hobart.



Death of Richard Sidney Goldsmith
Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899) Thu 17 Aug 1854 Page 2 Family Notices



Goldsmith, Richard Sidney [sic - Sydney]
Record Type: Deaths
Gender: Male
Age:24
Date of death:15 Aug 1854
Registered:Hobart
Registration year:1854
Record ID:NAME_INDEXES:1192493
Resource:RGD35/1/4 no 1429

Richard Sydney Goldsmith's death was registered on 15th August 1854 by Captain James Duff Mackay, and not by Richard's parents Captain and Elizabeth Goldsmith, which may suggest they were not ashore in Hobart in mid August 1854. Captain James Duff Mackay's residence was directly opposite the Anglesea Barracks gate in Davey Street where he was the Barrack Master and paymaster for the 50th Regiment of Foot until departure for London where died on 24th January, 1879, aged 96 years old. His extraordinary longevity he may have credited in no small part to Mr. Weaver's Antibilious Pills which he endorsed in advertisements for chemists Weaver & Co.
"I have no hesitation in pronouncing them the best and SAFEST MEDICINES in the world"
Advertisement for antibilious pills endorsed by Captain James Duff Mackay,  
Source: The Mercury 12 November 1877

Arrival of the barque "Angelina" at Sydney, NSW
There is an error in these reports of Vessels Laid on for Sydney and Vessels Expected In Sydney of November 1845. They published Captain Edward Goldsmith's name as master of two ships sailing simultaneously: the Angelina and the Parrock Hall due to leave from the Downs on July 15, 1845. It may have been a last minute decision on the part of ship owner Robert Brooks to sell the Parrock Hall, perhaps because it needed repairs, or perhaps it could not be fully loaded in time for a quick turnaround. Yet it was scheduled to sail. On the previous voyage in command of the Parrock Hall, Captain Goldsmith had departed London on 15th July 1844, sailing into Sydney Harbour on November 5th, 1844. The ship cleared out on the return voyage from Sydney to London on January 15th, 1845. Captain Goldsmith arrived back at Portsmouth on the Parrock Hall with barely a few weeks on shore before taking command of the Angelina, sailing from the Downs on 19th July 1845.



Captain Goldsmith scheduled to sail on two ships, Angelina and Parrock Hall, on the same date.
Source: The Australian (Sydney, NSW : 1824 - 1848) Sat 29 Nov 1845 Page 2 SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE



Captain Goldsmith scheduled to sail on two ships, Angelina and Parrock Hall, on the same date.
The Shipping Gazette and Sydney General Trade List (NSW : 1844 - 1860) Sat 1 Nov 1845 Page 275 VESSELS EXPECTED IN SYDNEY.

RECORD of ARRIVAL of the "ANGELINA" at Port Jackson (Sydney NSW) 12 Dec 1845
ANGELINA BARQUE, TONNAGE 433, MASTER GOLDSMITH, SAILED 19 JULY 1845
FROM WHENCE, LONDON VIA CAPE GOOD HOPE TO PORT JACKSON 12 DECEMBER, 1845
GOLDSMITH EDWD MASTER
19 VARIOUS VARIOUS CREW
COLLINS MRS PASSENGER CABIN
COLLINS SON 1 PASSENGER CABIN
COLLINS SON 2 PASSENGER CABIN
COLLINS SON 3 PASSENGER CABIN
COLLINS DAUGHTER 1 PASSENGER CABIN
COLLINS DAUGHTER 2 PASSENGER CABIN
COLLINS MASTER PASSENGER CABIN
BOWERMAN MRS PASSENGER CABIN
BOWERMAN DAUGHTER PASSENGER CABIN
BOWERMAN MISS 1 PASSENGER CABIN
BOWERMAN MISS 2 PASSENGER CABIN
HUGHES MR PASSENGER CABIN
HUNT MR PASSENGER CABIN
BARRATT MR PASSENGER CABIN
HOGAN MRS PASSENGER STEERAGE
HOGAN SON PASSENGER STEERAGE
HOGAN MASTER PASSENGER STEERAGE
KERR MRS PASSENGER STEERAGE
KERR DAUGHTER PASSENGER STEERAGE
HOGAN MISS PASSENGER STEERAGE
KERR ROBT PASSENGER STEERAGE
KERR WM PASSENGER STEERAGE
KERR JANE PASSENGER STEERAGE



Source: Mariners and ships in Australian Waters
http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/1845/12/016ang.htm
State Records Authority of New South Wales: Shipping Master's Office;

SUMMARY
HEALTH OFFICER's REPORT for the Angelina 12th December 1845
The ship Angelina 433 tonnage, Edward Goldsmith, Master, sailed from the Downs (UK) on 19th July 1845. The only port touched on during the passage was stated as the Cape of Good Hope, on 23rd October 1845, where sundries were received. The Angelina was carrying general cargo, 14 cabin passengers, 9 in steerage and 19 crew. The captain reported no "intercourse or communication" with other ships on the passage, and no sickness or disease on board on arrival.



Sydney Cove 1850s
SLNSW Ref: a12871h

Robert Brooks' accounts for Captain Goldsmith 1845-6
These original documents are held in two Australian collections: the National Library of Australia and the Mitchell Library, State Library of NSW. One idiosyncratic aspect of Robert Brooks' character commented on by all who conducted business with him was the meticulous care he took with double entry bookkeeping at his counting house, where he only ever employed a handful of clerks (Broeze, 1993 p.294).



Source: Records of Robert Brooks and Co.
NLA MS 2381
Photo copyright © KLW NFC Imprint 2016
National Library of Australia
Robert Brooks and Co & Robert Towns and Co. (1822-1890).
Records of Robert Brooks and Co.,
MS 2381 comprises 11 volumes of records documenting the business affairs of merchants and wool importers, Robert Brooks and Co. in 1841-1876. The collection includes two letterbooks, two journals and two ledgers, among other records (2 boxes, 2 fol. boxes, 1 elephant folio). Further business correspondence, 1862-1890, is available on microfilm. MS 2381-Records of Robert Brooks and Co., 1822-1890 [manuscript].
Above: Dr debit and Cr credit Ledger for the barque Angelina, Captain Goldsmith master, 1845.
Below: continued on next page ...



Continued ... Dr (debit) and Cr (credit) ship Angelina, Captain Goldsmith master, 1845-1846
Source: Records of Robert Brooks and Co.
NLA MS 2381
Photo copyright © KLW NFC Imprint 2016

Captain Edward Goldsmith signed off this invoice (above) to the value of £6139.16.3, the equivalent of approx. $771,765.00 current USD dollars, debited as the cost of the voyage of the Angelina to Port Jackson, Sydney, NSW , arriving 12th December 1845, departing Sydney for London on the return voyage, February 22nd 1846.

Although the only port visited on the voyage out from London which Captain Goldsmith recorded on the Health Officer's Report at Sydney was the Cape of Good Hope, he must have anchored briefly at Fayal, an island in the Azores off the coast of Lisbon, Portugal (reached in the 1780s by Captain Cook before entering on his Pacific voyages) because Captain Goldsmith's expenses, both official and personal at Fayal for which he sought disbursement, amounted to nearly £45. These ledger entries detail some of the disbursements paid by Robert Brooks to Captain Goldsmith on this voyage, including the profits.

Details on the left side of the ledger:
18 July 1846:
Captain Goldsmith Disbursements at Sydney £943.18.10
Ditto (Captain Goldsmith Disbursements) at Fayal £39.4.1
Ditto (Captain Goldsmith Disbursements) at London £2.0.0
Ditto (Captain Goldsmith Disbursements) Portage bill 14 July to 6 July 45 £449.10.6
Ditto (Captain Goldsmith Disbursements) Wages 13 June 45 to 13 July £130.0.0.
Ditto (Captain Goldsmith Disbursements) Personal expenses at Fayal £3.8.6
Dec 28 1846 Duff Captn Goldsmith Protest £3.11.2
July 9 1847 Capt Goldsmith 1/4th Profit £302.9.2
Angelina P/Dr 3/4th ditto (profit) £1603.3.9
Total: £6439.16.3

The credits as follows appear on the right side of the ledger:
By amount brt forward ...£4914.7.4
Dec 31st 1846
Angelina Lloyds Surveys £6.4.0
Captain Goldsmith bal. Mrs Bowerman £26. passage £62.9.8
Total: £6439.16.3



Looking south from Dawes Point past ships at Campbell’s wharf to Circular Quay, 1857?
Digital Order Number: a8143022
Stereographs of Sydney scenes, 1850-1870 / by William Hetzer and J. R. Clarke
State Library of NSW

Merchandise ex "Angelina" 1845
On arrival, Brooks' agent at Sydney, Robert Towns, placed this advertisement in the Sydney Morning Herald urging consignees to claim their merchandise.



Robert Towns, agent for Robert Brooks
Source: The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tue 16 Dec 1845 Page 4 Advertising

The Angelina's consignments of luxury goods ordered by local merchants included every desirable article. For example, various types of lace sourced from France; lama wool from the most exclusive suppliers to Royalty and the London gentry; cords, buckskins and Tweeds adapted to the needs of the colonial Settler; raisins from the Cape of Good Hope; gold necklaces, brooches, bracelets, and Geneva watches; salt, salad oil and hemp seeds; finest black japan, paints for artists, coach and house painters; rich balzorines and wool dresses for summer; wine and fruit, ale porter and old Tom gin.

LACE GOODS



Lace goods ex Angelina
Source: The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Mon 29 Dec 1845 Page 3 Advertising

TRANSCRIPT
JUST OPENED
BY AUGUSTUS DREUTLER,
FOREIGN WAREHOUSE, 287, PITT STREET,
Ex Angelina,
THE FOLLOWING LACE GOODS
Cotton and platt edgings
Children's and women's cotton lace
Platt ditto
Run platt ditto
Patent jacquered ditto
Fancy honeycomb ditto
Imitation Valenciennes ditto
Rich imitation of Mechlin ditto
" " Brussels ditto
" " Point ditto French blond edgings
Whisker blonds Paris "
Fancy silk net, &c, &c.
Although the above assortment of goods is
one of the handsomest in town, A. D. is resolved to offer it at exceedingly low prices ; small profits and quick returns being his principle.
Source: The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Mon 29 Dec 1845 Page 3 Advertising

LAMA WOOL



Lama ex Angelina
Source: The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Mon 29 Dec 1845 Page 3 Advertising

TRANSCRIPT
NO BUNKUM.
THE undersigned respectfully invites the attention of the Settlers and the Colonists generally to an early inspection of his varied and extensive stock of goods ex Hamlet and Angelina, which having been selected by himself from some of the first houses in London, and purchased for CASH, enables him to offer them at prices less by one-third than any hitherto offered by any legitimate tradesman in the colony, thus enabling parties from the interior to obtain first rate garments which cannot be excelled by any house in Sydney for style, cut, quality, and make, at the very lowest prices consistent with good material and workmanship.
Amongst the variety selected are a few choice patterns of the newly invented material called the Lama, so much patronised by his Royal Highness the Prince Consort, the nobility, and gentry of England. The wool of the Lama undergoes the process of dyeing, and other matters necessary in the course of manufacture, better than ordinary wool, whilst from its natural silken softness, greater comfort and wear and durability is the result. It has all the appearance of superfine cloth, but the lightness of its texture renders it peculiarly adapted to this climate.
TO THE SETTLERS !
One visit will convince them that no other house can compete with this in goods suitable for the interior. Amongst which is a great variety of stout Windsor and Manchester Cords, so much enquired after for riding trousers. Also an endless variety of Buck-skins, twisted Doeskins, Stockinets, and Tweeds, both English and colonial.
A list of prices is considered superfluous, as all who have favoured him with their orders can testify to the celebrity to which his establishment has attained- by his being the first who reformed the previous exorbitant prices of wearing apparel in this colony.
N.B. Persons from the country can be supplied with every description of ready made Clothing, colonial made, at much less than English prices.
HENRY HAYES,
416, George-street.
RAISINS
Dried fruit as well - apples peaches, and pears.



Raisins, apples, peaches, pears ex Angelina
Source: The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wed 24 Dec 1845 Page 4 Advertising

GOLD JEWELLERY
Necklaces, brooches, bracelets, Geneva watches, pins and pen cutters and plated ware were among this consignment.



Gold and Jewellery ex Angelina
Source: The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Fri 19 Dec 1845 Page 3 Advertising

GROCERIES



Groceries ex Angelina
Source: The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thu 18 Dec 1845 Page 1 Advertising

PAINTS



Paints ex Angelina
Source: The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thu 18 Dec 1845 Page 1 Advertising

TRANSCRIPT
SALES BY AUCTION.
POSTPONED UNTIL WEDNESDAY NEXT, IN
CONSEQUENCE OF SOME OF THE PACKAGES NOT BEING LANDED IN TIME.
TO OIL AND COLOUR MEN, COACH
AND HOUSE PAINTERS, &c.
NOW LANDING,
Ex " ANGELINA."
MR. EDWARD SÀLAMON will sell
by auction, at his Rooms, George-street,
THIS DAY, DECEMBER 24,
At eleven o'clock,
(By order of the Consignee.)
J&JS- 1 Cask, containing twelve tins.
each two gallons, finest black japan
1 Ditto, containing twelve tins, I each two gallons, best car-
riage varnish, from the well known house of Noble and - Rolls
2 Casks fine powdered Venetian
red
2 Ditto damp blue
2 Ditto English umber 2 Ditto celestial blue
2 Ditto powdered ochre 2 Ditto green copperas 8 Ditto fine red lead
2 Ditto Brunswick green 1 Ditto Emerald ditto 10 Ditto washing soda
JM 26 Jars, each 5 gallons, boiled oil
25 Tins, " 5 ditto, ditto
10 Tins, " 3 ditto, turpentine
The above goods are now in course of
landing, and having been ordered ex-pressly for this market, are particularly recommended to the notice of the trade, as the whole will be sold without any
reserve.
_Terms at sale.

DRESSES
Rich balzorines and wool dresses for summer



Rich balzorines and wool dresses for summer ex Angelina
Source: The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Sat 20 Dec 1845 Page 3 Advertising





Balzorine, a mixture of wool and cotton
Source: The Peterson Magazine, Volumes 9-10, 1846, p.179

WINE and FRUIT
Pipes of Cape wine, and 10 bags of Barcelona nuts, which Captain Goldsmith may have purchased at Fayal.



Wine, fruit and nuts ex Angelina
Source: The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Sat 20 Dec 1845 Page 3 Advertising

GIN fine flavoured



Gin ex Angelina
Source: The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Sat 20 Dec 1845 Page 3 Advertising

ALE and PORTER



Ale and Porter ex Angelina
Source: The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Sat 20 Dec 1845 Page 3 Advertising

OLD TOM (gin) from London


Old Tom ex Angelina
Source: The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Sat 27 Dec 1845 Page 4 Advertising

Departure of "Angelina" 1846 from Sydney, NSW
Loading for London off Town's wharf, on 24th January 1846, Captain Goldsmith finally departed Sydney for the return voyage to London in command of the Angelina on 22nd February 1846 with a cargo of produce and 36 passengers,  .





Notices: Captain Goldsmith, master of the Angelina January 1846 off Towns Wharf
Source:The Shipping Gazette and Sydney General Trade List (NSW : 1844 - 1860)
Sat 24 Jan 1846 Page 21 SHIPS IN HARBOUR

On the return voyage the Angelina was struck by an iceberg in the Southern Ocean, sustaining damage to the foredeck and losing the bowsprit. With makeshift repairs, Captain Goldsmith sailed the barque safely back past Portsmouth on 4th July 1846. Barely twenty days back on shore in London, he was ready – and for this voyage so was his wife Elizabeth Goldsmith who would accompany him with just one other cabin passenger, Josiah Spode – to set sail again. Captain Goldsmith took command of the superior barque the Rattler, new off the stocks, which Robert Brooks had commissioned specifically for him, on 24th July 1846, his sights set once more for Van Diemen’s Land.



Towns Wharf, numbered as Pier 8, and the Port Authority building, Towns Place, Sydney Harbour NSW
Next to the Barangaroo development, Millers Point
Photos copyright © KLW NFC 2013

Barque "Angelina" 1847-1848 to NSW
Robert Brooks maintained the Angelina as a trader in the Pacific, carrying passengers and produce, e.g. tea, between Hong Kong, Singapore and Sydney. He disposed of the Angelina in 1850 (Broeze, Mr Brooks and the Australian Trade, 1993:150).

Barque Angelina 19 December 1847 ex Hong Kong
ANGELINA BARQUE, WILLIAM MORGAN, MASTER, BURTHEN 433 TONS
FROM THE PORT OF HONG KONG via ADELAIDE TO PORT JACKSON, NEW SOUTH WALES
19TH DECEMBER 1847
Surname Given name Station Age Of what Nation Status Comments
MORGAN WILLIAM MASTER CREW Sailed 21 Nov.1847
18 VARIOUS VARIOUS CREW
KIERULF MR. PASSENGER CABIN
Barque Angelina from Singapore 14 Sept 1848
ANGELINA BARQUE OF LONDON, WILLIAM MORGAN, MASTER, BURTHEN 434 TONS,
FROM THE PORT OF SINGAPORE TO PORT JACKSON, NEW SOUTH WALES, 14TH SEPTEMBER 1848
Surname Given name Station Age Of what Nation Status Comments 
MORGAN WILLIAM MASTER CREW Sailed 16 July 1848
20 VARIOUS VARIOUS CREW Lading Tea Sugar etc.
MATHEWS MR PASSENGER CABIN
MATHEWS MRS PASSENGER CABIN
MATHEWS CHILD 1 BOY PASSENGER CABIN
MATHEWS CHILD 2 BOY PASSENGER CABIN
MATHEWS CHILD 3 BOY PASSENGER CABIN
MATHEWS CHILD 4 GIRL PASSENGER CABIN
SENSTHILL MR PASSENGER CABIN

Source: State Records Authority of New South Wales: Shipping Master's Office; Passengers Arriving 1826 - 1900; Part Colonial Secretary series covering 1845 - 1853, reels 1272 [4/5227] -1280 [4/5244]. Transcribed by Lyn Mulcahy.



Source:http://marinersandships.com.au/1848/09/4809.htm

French Whaler "Angelina" to Hobart 19 December 1849
The female prison transport the Angelina, owned by Joseph Somes and sold to Robert Brooks in 1845, is not to be confused with the French whaler Angelina built at Le Havre, 445 tons, which visited Hobart on 19th December 1849 with 37 French crew, carrying ballast and stores.



French whaler Angelina, 19 December 1849
Source: Archives Office Tasmania
https://stors.tas.gov.au/CUS36-1-36

The National Library of New Zealand holds a report on the exploration by the crew of the whaler Angelina 1849:







Title: Rapport / de M. Dutaillis.
Author: Dutaillis, M.
Creation Date: 1849
Format: p. [145]-198 ; 23 cm
Language: French
Notes: Caption title.
"Sur sa mission aux îles Mulgraves."
"L'objet de l'exploration est la recherche d'une partie de l'équipage du baleinier l'Angélina."
Detached from: Revue coloniale, mars et avril, 1849.
Source: NLNZ ALMA
9911711593502836

Addenda: sick lists of the female convict ship "Angelina" 1844
Source: http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C4106412
National Archives Record Summary of Surgeon's Journal: List 1, List 2, List 3

ADM 101/2/9 - Medical journal of the Angelina, hired convict ship, for 3 April to 31 August 1844 by J E Ring, surgeon and superintendent, during which time the said ship was employed in the convict service.

ADM 101/2/9/1 1844
Folios 1-4: Copy of daily sick list, (names and details follow): Folio 1: Title sheet of daily sick list.
Folio 2: Elizabeth Watson, aged 30, convict; sick or hurt, dyspepsia; put on sick list 26 April 1844, put off sick list 30 April 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Ann Finan, aged 18, convict; sick or hurt, diarrhoea; put on sick list 2 May 1844, put off sick list 9 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: John Merry, aged 10, convict's child; sick or hurt, diarrhoea; put on sick list 2 May 1844, put off sick list 8 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Sarah Done, aged 4, convict's child; sick or hurt, diarrhoea; put on sick list 2 May 1844, put off sick list 9 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Ann Titlah, aged 31, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 3 May 1844, put off sick list 7 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Margaret Roberts, aged 29, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 3 May 1844, put off sick list 9 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Mary Lovett, aged 2, convict's child; sick or hurt, scrofula; put on sick list 4 May 1844, died 2 June 1844.
Folio 2: Ann Alderman, aged 33, convict; sick or hurt, fever; put on sick list 5 May 1844, put off sick list 24 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Mary Ann Lambert, aged 26, convict; sick or hurt, fever; put on sick list 5 May 1844, put off sick list 25 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Mary Stewart, aged 52, convict; sick or hurt, rheumatism; put on sick list 6 May 1844, sent 27 August 1844 to Colonial hospital.
Folio 2: Jane Young, aged 19, convict; sick or hurt, fever; put on sick list 6 May 1844, put off sick list 29 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Martha Docherty, aged 40, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 7 May 1844, put off sick list 11 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Elizabeth McInalty, aged 19, convict; sick or hurt, phlegmon; put on sick list 10 May 1844, put off sick list 14 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Mary McKinnon, aged 37, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 10 May 1844, put off sick list 15 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Maria Lovett, aged 21, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 11 May 1844, put off sick list 15 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Mary Ann Thompson, aged 22, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 12 May 1844, put off sick list 16 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Jane Potter, aged 21, convict; sick or hurt, phlegmon; put on sick list 15 May 1844, put off sick list 17 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Ann Grimshaw, aged 32, convict; sick or hurt, pneumonia; put on sick list 19 May 1844, put off sick list 10 June 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Bridget Franklin, aged 23, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 21 May 1844, put off sick list 27 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Mary Riley, aged 17, convict; sick or hurt, rheumatism; put on sick list 24 May 1844, put off sick list 4 June 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Rose Morgan, aged 22, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 24 May 1844, put off sick list 30 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Mary Ann Lippett, aged 20, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 24 May 1844, put off sick list 29 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Thomas Levy, aged 2, convict's child; sick or hurt, diarrhoea; put on sick list 25 May 1844, put off sick list 31 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Jane Perry, aged 40, convict; sick or hurt, phlegmon; put on sick list 27 May 1844, put off sick list 31 May 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Agnes McDonald, aged 17, convict; sick or hurt, pneumonia; put on sick list 28 May 1844, put off sick list 12 June 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Ann Wotton, aged 20, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 28 May 1844, put off sick list 1 June 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Eleanor Thompson, aged 33, convict; sick or hurt, phlegmon; put on sick list 30 May 1844, put off sick list 3 June 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Ann Robinson, aged 22, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 1 June 1844, put off sick list 7 June 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Harriet Johnson, aged 32, convict; sick or hurt, aneurism; put on sick list 3 June 1844, died 24 June 1844.
Folio 2: Catherine Patterson, aged 33, convict; sick or hurt, rheumatism; put on sick list 5 June 1844, put off sick list 19 June 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Eliza Thompson, aged 46, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 8 June 1844, put off sick list 14 June 1844 cured.
Folio 2: Mary Swan, aged 19, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 8 June 1844, put off sick list 15 June 1844 cured.
Folio 3: Jean Low, aged 45, convict; sick or hurt, phlegmon; put on sick list 10 June 1844, put off sick list 15 June 1844 cured.
Folio 3: Margaret Hamilton, aged 16, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 11 June 1844, put off sick list 16 June 1844 cured.
Folio 3: Elizabeth Brown, aged 53, convict; sick or hurt, rheumatism; put on sick list 14 June 1844, put off sick list 29 June 1844 cured.
Folio 3: Elizabeth Marsh, aged 58, convict; sick or hurt, rheumatism; put on sick list 14 June 1844, put off sick list 30 June 1844 cured.
Folio 3: Ann Grainger, aged 19, convict; sick or hurt, enteritis; put on sick list 15 June 1844, died 6 July 1844.
Folio 3: Ann Heaton, aged 20, convict; sick or hurt, rheumatism; put on sick list 17 June 1844, sent 27 August 1844 to Colonial hospital.
Folio 3: Ann Dyke, aged 24, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 20 June 1844, put off sick list 24 June 1844 cured.
Folio 3: Harriet Owen, aged 22, convict; sick or hurt, phlegmon; put on sick list 21 June 1844, put off sick list 25 June 1844 cured.
Folio 3: Emma Groom, aged 22, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 23 June 1844, put off sick list 27 June 1844 cured.
Folio 3: Matilda Kettle, aged 18, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 24 June 1844, put off sick list 29 June 1844 cured.
Folio 3: Mary Ann Kelly, aged 19, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 25 June 1844, put off sick list 29 June 1844 cured.
Folio 3: Emma Cato, aged 24, convict; sick or hurt, pneumonia; put on sick list 27 June 1844, put off sick list 9 July 1844 cured.
Folio 3: Mary Ford, aged 19, convict; sick or hurt, syphilis cum phthisisconfirmata; put on sick list 27 June 1844, died 15 July 1844.
Folio 3: Mary Savage, aged 1 ½, convict's child; sick or hurt, scrofula; put on sick list 28 June 1844, died 15 July 1844.
Folio 3: Elizabeth Taylor, aged 20, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 30 June 1844, put off sick list 7 July 1844 cured.
Folio 3: Sarah Wood, aged 15, convict; sick or hurt, phlegmon; put on sick list 1 July 1844, put off sick list 5 July 1844 cured.
Folio 3: Mary Webb, aged 16, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 4 July 1844, put off sick list 9 July 1844 cured.
ADM 101/2/9/2 1844
Folios 1-4: Copy of daily sick list, (names and details follow) - continued:
Folio 3: Cahrlotte Gildard, aged 23, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 5 July 1844, put off sick list 11 July 1844 cured. Folio 3: Elizabeth Fee, aged 19, convict; sick or hurt, prolapsus uteri; put on sick list 7 July 1844, sent 27 August 1844 to Colonial hospital. Folio 3: Mary Ann Pratten, aged 22, convict; sick or hurt, pneumonia; put on sick list 7 July 1844, put off sick list 30 July 1844 cured. Folio 3: Ann Jones, aged 19, convict; sick or hurt, phlegmon; put on sick list 9 July 1844, put off sick list 12 July 1844 cured. Folio 3: Sarah Potton, aged 19, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 11 July 1844, put off sick list 16 July 1844 cured. Folio 3: Charlotte Reed, aged 25, convict; sick or hurt, dyspepsia; put on sick list 15 July 1844, put off sick list 22 July 1844 cured. Folio 3: Martha Minns, aged 19, convict; sick or hurt, scrofula; put on sick list 17 July 1844, sent 27 August 1844 to Colonial hospital. Folio 3: Mary Lloyd, aged 20, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 19 July 1844, put off sick list 24 July 1844 cured. Folio 3: Ann McCormick, aged 26, convict; sick or hurt, phlegmon; put on sick list 20 July 1844, put off sick list 23 July 1844 cured. Folio 3: Mary McBride, aged 7, convict's child; sick or hurt, scrofula; put on sick list 21 July 1844, sent 27 August1844 to Colonial hospital. Folio 3: Elizabeth Daw, aged 20, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 23 July 1844, put off sick list 29 July 1844 cured. Folio 3: Harriet Rowe, aged 17, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 24 July 1844, put off sick list 29 July 1844 cured. Folio 3: Sarah Ann Chiddy, aged 21, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 24 July 1844, put off sick list 30 July 1844 cured. Folio 3: Ann Dutton, aged 33, convict; sick or hurt, dyspepsia; put on sick list 28 July 1844, put off sick list 11 August 1844 cured. Folio 3: Ann Clark, aged 17, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 29 July 1844, put off sick list 4 August 1844 cured.
Folio 4: Jane Thornbury, aged 26, convict; sick or hurt, dyspepsia; put on sick list 1 August 1844, put off sick list 11 August 1844 cured. Folio 4: Mary Dumbrell, aged 17, convict; sick or hurt, dyspepsia; put on sick list 1 August 1844, put off sick list 14 August 1844 cured. Folio 4: Louisa Ellis, aged 18, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 2 August 1844, put off sick list 7 August 1844 cured. Folio 4: Elizabeth Lawrence, aged 20, convict; sick or hurt, ulcus; put on sick list 3 August 1844, sent 27 August 1844 to Colonial hospital. Folio 4: Eliza Trigg, aged 33, convict; sick or hurt, dyspepsia; put on sick list 5 August 1844, put off sick list 14 August 1844 cured. Folio 4: Rebecca Lewis, aged 31, convict; sick or hurt, dyspepsia; put on sick list 11 August 1844, put off sick list 21 August 1844 cured. Folio 4: Eliza Davies, aged 17, convict; sick or hurt, fever; put on sick list 11 August 1844, put off sick list 21 August 1844 cured. Folio 4: Mary Murphy, aged 16, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 12 August 1844, put off sick list 16 August 1844 cured. Folio 4: Emma Wilson, aged 25, convict; sick or hurt, rheumatism; put on sick list 14 August 1844, put off sick list 24 August 1844 cured. Folio 4: Charlotte Palfrey, aged 19, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 16 August 1844, put off sick list 20 August 1844 cured. Folio 4: Sarah Guy, aged 46, convict; sick or hurt, rheumatism; put on sick list 17 August 1844, put off sick list 27 August 1844 cured. Folio 4: Mary Huxley, aged 18, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 17 August 1844, put off sick list 22 August 1844 cured. Folio 4: Mary Hutchins, aged 49, convict; sick or hurt, rheumatism; put on sick list 18 August 1844, put off sick list 27 August 1844 cured. Folio 4: Eliza Blacklock, aged 30, convict; sick or hurt, pneumonia; put on sick list 18 August 1844, put off sick list 28 August 1844 cured. Folio 4: Ann Cloes, aged 19, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 18 August 1844, put off sick list 24 August 1844 cured. Folio 4: Mary Green, aged 28, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 19 August 1844, put off sick list 22 August 1844 cured. Folio 4: Jane Brady, aged 16, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 19 August 1844, put off sick list 23 August 1844 cured. Folio 4: Jane Hind, aged 30, convict; sick or hurt, catarrh; put on sick list 20 August 1844, put off sick list 24 August 1844 cured. Folio 4: Mary Conner, aged 31, convict; sick or hurt, amentia; put on sick list 24 August 1844, sent 27 August 1844 to Colonial hospital. Folio 4: Mary Gilmore, aged 22, convict; sick or hurt, phlegmon; put on sick list 24 August 1844, put off sick list 26 August 1844 cured. Folio 4: Sarah McKenzie, aged 24, convict; sick or hurt, phlegmon; put on sick list 24 August 1844, put off sick list 27 August 1844 cured. Signed: J E Ring, surgeon and superintendent.
ADM 101/2/9/3 1844 Folios 5-26
Folios 5-6: case no 1, Mary Lovett, aged 2, convict's child; taken ill at sea; sick or hurt, scrofula with marasmus; put on sick list 4 May 1844, died 2 June 1844.
Folios 7-8: case no 2, Mary Stewart, aged 52, convict; taken ill at sea; sick or hurt, rheumatism; put on sick list 6 May 1844, sent 27 August 1844 to Colonial hospital at Hobart Town.
Folios 8-10: case no 3, Ann Grimshaw, aged 32, convict; taken ill at sea; sick or hurt, pneumonia; put on sick list 19 May 1844, discharged 10 June 1844 cured.
Folios 10-11: case no 4, Harriet Johnson, aged 35, convict; taken ill at sea; sick or hurt, aneurism, very delicate appearance subject for sometime past to palpitation and irregularity in the heart's action the symptoms become more urgent, the countenance is pale and anxious, pulse 98 full and bounding, complains of a sense of oppression in the pit of the stomach and the slightest exertion produces faintness, digestive organs not inmpaired and the bowels regular; put on sick list 1 June 1844, died 24 June 1844 at 2 am.
Folios 11-13: case no 5, Ann Grainger, aged 17, convict; taken ill at sea; sick or hurt, enteritis, had been in the enjoyment of good health up to this time until was attacked with severe griping paroxysmal pains about the navel, pulse hard small and incomprehensible, countenance pale and indicating great distress, bowels costive for several days was at once bled to 30 ounces, placed in a warm bath followed by warm formentations and bolus of calomel with ext. hyoscyamus was given, from 17th of June the patient rapidly got better until the 5th of July when she left the hospital and improvidently exposed herself to the cold upon deck she was immediately seized with violent pain about the novel and the disease returned with the greatest severity; put on sick list 15 June 1844, died 4 July 1844 at 11 am.
Folios 13-14: case no 6, Mary Ford, aged 17, convict; taken ill at sea; sick or hurt, syphilis et phthisis pulmonalis, was called upon by the patient depression of spirits and the declining state of her general health for she made no complaint and kept out of my way as much as possible, found that she was suffering from secondary syphilis of long standing, which she managed to conceal from the medical men of the prison. She had extensive ulceration about the anus and vagina with a copious foul discharge also suffered from a short cough difficulty of breathing and lightness in the chest which was narrow and contracted, was a weak scrophulas habit and evident of lungs diseased, she was immediately placed in a warm bath, the black wash was ordered for the sores with bule pill, mild expectorants with opium was also prescribed; put on sick list 27 June 1844, died 15 July 1844 at 2 pm.
Folios 14-16: case no 7, Emma Cato, aged 22, convict; taken ill at sea; sick or hurt, pneumonia, this woman had been a nurse in the hospital from the time of sailing, she was turned out of that situation for theft and general bad conduct, had been a common prostitute and has therefore led a most depraved life, her temper is violent and unmanageable and since her dismissal from the hospital has given way to its influence, I mention this circumstance as I am persuaded that her present illness has been brought on by it; put on sick list 27 June 1844, discharged 9 July 1844 cured.
Folios 17-18: case no 8, Mary Savage, aged 1 ½, convict's child; taken ill at sea; sick or hurt, scrofula with infantile remittent fever, was suffering from tabes mesenterica when brought on board from her appearance I did not expect that she could live any length of time; put on sick list 28 June 1844, died 15 July 1844.
Folios 18-20: case no 9, Ann Heaton, aged 21, convict; taken ill at sea; sick or hurt, rheumatismus; put on sick list 17 June 1844, sent 27 August 1844 to Colonial hospital at Van Diemen's Land.
Folios 20-22: case no 10, Mary Connor, aged 40, convict; taken ill at sea; sick or hurt, amentia, had been under medical observation all the voyage, she exhibited the greatest silliness of character and was a laughing stock to all the women, she was noisy and troublesome in her mess when she was constantly causing quarrels, 'from what I had observed of this woman, I considered her as a fit subject for a lunatic asylum'; put on sick list 24 August 1844, sent 27 August 1844 to Colonial hospital at Van Diemen's Land, after wards by a board of medical officers to an establishment for the insane.
Folios 22-23: case no 11, Elizabeth Lawrence, aged 20, convict; taken ill at sea; sick or hurt, ulcus, of a tall fine woman of rather a full habit, brought up in the country, suffered from slight dyspeptic symptoms; put on sick list 27 August 1844, sent 27 August 1844 to hospital.
Folio 23: nosological return of cases mentioned in the journal.
Folios 24-26: Surgeon's general remarks. The Angelina left Woolwich on 28 April 1844 with 170 female convicts and 18 children on board. Two of the children were in bad health on embarkation, they became subjects of tabes musenterica and died on the voyage. Three deaths amongst the women, one from aneurism which was sudden and unexpected, the second from phthisis brought on by a much neglected syphilitic complaint and the third from enteritis. The surgeon considered the voyage a successful one, in which he stated that those unfortunate women were more manageable than he had calculated upon at sailing.
Date:1844
Held by: The National Archives, Kew
Legal status:Public Record(s)
Source: http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C4106412

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